The Mystery Of Bermuda

Technology

Western part Of North Atlantic ocean also called Devil’s Triangle 1950 article published in The Miami Herald (Associated Press) by Edward Van Winkle Jones. Two years later,Fate magazine George X. Sand covering the loss of several planes and ships, including the loss of Flight 19, a group of five US Navy Grumman A torpedo Bomber on a training mission.The American Legion Magazine is reported to have written regarding pilot’s last words and if we summarize them,they state that the water of the sea was ‘unusual’. Another speculation made regarding to this incident was that the ship flew off to Mars.But,when unusual or unpredictable things to happen then unusual or unpredictable speculations are also made. Vincent Gaddis’ article “The Deadly Bermuda Triangle” argued that Flight 19 and other disappearances were part of a pattern of strange events in the region.In 1992, when the UK Channel 4 television program The Bermuda Triangle (1992) was being produced by John Simmons of Geo films for the Equinox series, the marine insurance market Lloyd’s of London was asked if an unusually large number of ships had sunk in the Bermuda Triangle area. Lloyd’s determined that large numbers of ships had not sunk there. Lloyd’s does not charge higher rates for passing through this area.United States coast guard records confirm their conclusion. In fact, the number of supposed disappearances is relatively insignificant considering the number of ships and aircraft that pass through on a regular basis. Triangle writers have used a number of supernatural concepts to explain the events. One explanation pins the blame on leftover technology from the mythical lost continent of Atlantis. Sometimes connected to the Atlantis story is the submerged rock formation known as the Bimini Road off the island of Bimini  in the Bahamas, which is in the Triangle by some definitions. Even though there would be many explanations for the odd behavior of the triangle but the incidents always indicate that there is a secret force behind them. The Ellen Austin supposedly came across a derelict ship, placed on board a prize crew, and attempted to sail with it to New York in 1881. According to the stories, the derelict disappeared; others elaborating further that the derelict reappeared minus the prize crew, then disappeared again with a second prize crew on board. The incident resulting in the single largest loss of life in the history of the US Navy not related to combat occurred when the collier USS Cyclops, carrying a full load of manganese ore and with one engine out of action, went missing without a trace with a crew of 309 sometime after March 4, 1918, after departing the island of Barbados. Although there is no strong evidence for any single theory, many independent theories exist, some blaming storms, some capsizing, and some suggesting that wartime enemy activity was to blame for the loss. In addition, two of Cyclops‘s sister ships, Proteus and Nereus were subsequently lost in the North Atlantic during World war 2  Both ships were transporting heavy loads of metallic ore similar to that which was loaded on Cyclops during her fatal voyage. In all three cases structural failure due to overloading with a much denser cargo than designed is considered the most likely cause of sinking. A five-masted schooner built in 1919, the Carroll A. Deering was found hard aground and abandoned at Diamond Shoals, near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina on January 31, 1921. Rumors and more at the time indicated the Deering was a victim of piracy, possibly connected with the illegal rum-running trade during Prohibition, and possibly involving another ship, SS Hewitt which disappeared at roughly the same time. Just hours later, an unknown steamer sailed near the lightship along the track of the Deering, and ignored all signals from the lightship. It is speculated that Hewitt may have been this mystery ship, and possibly involve the Deering crew’s disappearance.

Muhammad Shaheer Amir,

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